If Wishes Were Horses!

The age-old proverb that, “If wishes were horses, beggars would ride”, is as true today as it was in the 16th century – the time of its inception.

Today, we are surrounded by a witness of people who, rather than acting on their dreams and goals, only live a wishful life. They wish to live in a beautiful home, ride the latest SUV cars, travel the world over, etc. Unfortunately for them, they never live to see these come into fruition.

While a few people, called achievers, transcend from just wishing to acting on their dreams and aspirations, most others remain wishers for far too long, if not all their lives. In this article, we’ll take a look at the differences between a wisher and an achiever. What the key characteristics are that wishers can learn from achievers. What are those character traits that wishers are known for, that you may want to avoid falling for? Let’s see . . .

1. Intention

The word, “intention” originates from the root word, “intent”. The Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines “intention” as, “the thing that you plan to do or achieve; an aim or purpose.” It also further defines it as, “a determination to act in a certain way; a resolve.”

While achievers go about their intentions every day, wishers may work just as hard, but going about other people’s businesses. Achievers have a reason for their life. They wake up every day, and have something to work on. There’s no day they’re ever clueless on what to do for the day.

Your intention is your purpose, and your purpose is your sole business to figure out. Anything you do outside of your purpose leaves you wandering for life. Let me ask you this question, ponder over it carefully, and answer it as honestly as you can: What is that one thing you’re living for?



2. Sustainability

Let’s face it, life is not easy. Life can hit you so hard that you may find yourself off-balance.

While we all plan and hope for things to work out as we expect, there are several roadblocks that anyone who is bent on becoming an achiever ought to contend with. Even though the achiever is just as beaten and battered by the challenges of life as wishers are, the former rises up and fights again.

Achievers understand that life is full of inevitable challenges. They comprehend that challenges are meant to serve as springboards to the fulfillment of their intentions. Challenges bring out the best in them, and do away with the worst in them.

Wishers may try, but in the event of challenges, they call it quits. We have wishers in business, career, relationships, etc. They are triers, but not achievers. If you want to achieve, don’t just try, act and act, until you win!

3. Passivity

Now, there are two different people you see whenever you go to a stadium; you see the players – the active partakers of the event of the day, and the spectators – the passive members. Let’s think about this a little more into details.

Every stadium is filled with noise from spectators. While the players go ahead to play for glory, fame, and prosperity, the spectators do not only pay to watch the players play, they also make the most noise.  This is how wishers live. Their lives are perfectly simulated by the spectators in a stadium.

They whine, complain, and lament about any and everything. They complain about the government, the prevailing economic conditions, their inability to get good education, etc. Wishers blame everyone but themselves for their woes. Whatever goes wrong about them, someone else is responsible.

On the other hand, achievers – the players in the stadium in this case, take absolute responsibility for the victory or loss of their team. If the team wins, then they win. If it loses, they lose, too.

Who are you; a spectator and passive, or an achiever and active in the game of life?

Life is full of a few achievers, and a host of wishers. Rather than living a wisher all your life, live the life of an achiever. If we can pay attention to the above, wishers will dramatically reduce in their numbers.

DARE TO ACHIEVE!

Written By: Jonathan Adzokpe
#TeamSkies


Comments

comments

No Comments Yet

Comments are closed

%d bloggers like this: